Guest of Honour

Lord Best Chair, Lords Communications Committee

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Overview
“It is increasingly clear that some behaviours which are unacceptable offline are being tolerated or even encouraged online – sometimes with devastating consequences.”

Karen Bradley MP, Secretary of State for Culture Media and Sport

Following on from the Government’s recent pledge to make the UK the safest place to be a child online, this timely and informative forum will provide delegates with an opportunity to meet with leading stakeholders across the sector to discuss ways to create a supportive and safe digital environment allowing children to enjoy the benefits of the internet whilst minimising the risks.

Focusing on recommendations from The Children Commissioner’s recently published Growing Up Digital report; discussions will include the role of parents and schools in teaching children digital citizenship, teaching them the skills to navigate the internet safely. Discussions will also focus on the need to extend children’s rights to the online world asking who is responsible for enforcing them and what are the options for post-EU legislation?

Delegates will also hear the recommendations from the Lords Communications Committee’s ongoing Children and the Internet inquiry, discussing the ways in which the internet is governed and regulated and the role of the media outlets and social media platforms in protecting younger internet users from harmful content and harmful behaviour.

Agenda
Start

08:30 - 09:00
Registration, Refreshments and Networking

 

09:00 - 09:05
Chair and Policy-UK Welcoming remarks

 
To be Confirmed


09:05 - 09:30
Children and the Internet : Moving forward with the recommendations of the Lords Select Communications Committee Inquiry

 
Lord Best, Chair, Lords Select Communications Committee





Speakers

Lord Best Chair, Lords Communications Committee

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09:30 - 10:20
Preparing Children for Life Online : Education, Awareness and Digital Citizenship

 
  • With children accessing the internet at an earlier age, often before starting school, what can parents do to ensure their children are learning how to use the internet safely and responsibly from the earliest opportunity and what support do parents need in order to provide this education to their children? What about children from lower-economic backgrounds who don’t have access to the internet at home?
  • Although the internet brings many positives there are also many risks such as cyber-bullying, online grooming, inappropriate, violent or sexual content and social media peer pressure; how would teaching the so-called “Digital Natives” to become “Digital Citizens” make sure that children are taught the required cyber social skills to navigate the internet safely and build online resilience as much as offline?
  • How can existing computing curriculums be enhanced to include the social skills required to use the internet and how can PSHE lessons be enhanced to include the transfer of real-world social skills online?
  • With recent legislative changes making sexting, online harassment and revenge porn criminal offences, how important is it to teach children and young people the laws that not only protect them but that they should adhere to themselves to avoid getting into trouble with the law? What strategies, such as peer learning, are most effective at engaging children and young people in internet safety and online awareness?

Speakers invitations under consideration 

 
- - - -  Questions, and answer session with delegates - - - -





Speakers

Vicki Shotbolt Chief Executive Officer, The Parent Zone and Executive Board of the UK Council for Child Internet Safety

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10:20 - 10:25
Chair's Closing Comments

 
To be announced

10:25 - 10:55
Refreshments and Networking Break

 

10:55 - 11:00
Chair's Welcome Back

 

11:00 - 11:50
Creating a Safer Online Environment : High Quality, Age-Appropriate, Safe Web Space - Funding, Delivery, and Plurality

 
  • What are the industry’s obligations, both legally and morally, when it comes to safeguarding young people on the internet?
  • Knowing that the internet contains content that is not suitable for children, how are content and platform providers monitoring content, how easy is it for young internet users to report inappropriate content and how fast are companies reacting to remove harmful content?
  • How effective are filters and parental controls in ensuring children are unable to access inappropriate material? How has the rise in apps and children playing games on smartphones and tablets affected the ability of parents and providers to monitor and filter content and how can in-app purchases be restricted?
  • What is the industry doing to ensure plurality and prevent excessive commercialisation? How is regulation helping to ensure children aren’t exposed to inappropriate ads online?
  • How well are age restrictions on websites and social media being enforced to ensure children aren’t accessing age-inappropriate websites and how well are community standards working to prevent social media and forum users from being exposed to content of a violent or sexual nature, abuse and cyber-bullying online? What improvements can be made to ensure behaviour that is not tolerated offline is not being accepted online? What more can websites, particularly social media, do to ensure that young users are more aware of implications of using their platforms? How can terms and conditions be made more teenage-friendly - clear and understandable - so as users can make informed choices and be more aware of what they’re signing up for in terms of data protection and privacy?

Speaker invitations under consideration

- - - -  Questions, and answer session with delegates - - - -






Speakers

Richard Pursey CEO and Co-Founder of SafeToNet

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Miles Lockwood Director of Complaints and Investigations, Advertising Standards Authority

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11:50 - 12:05
Keeping Children Safe : A Case Study

 
To be announced

12:05 - 12:55
Collaborative Approaches to Safety : Parents, Teachers, CSPs, Content Makers and Regulators

 
  • What is the latest thinking in strategies to improve collaboration between all the players in young people’s online life including teachers and parents, CSPs and content, and policymakers and regulators in a bid to extend the offline rights of children to the online world protecting a child’s digital identity, their online privacy, their right to freedom of expression online and their right to be shielded from violence and sexual abuse online and putting in mechanisms to prevent breaches of these rights?
  • Is a figure or body required, such as the Children’s Digital Ombudsman suggested by The Children’s Commissioner, required to monitor and protect the rights of children online? What can be learnt from the introduction of Australia’s Children’s esafety Commissioner and how could a similar role work here in the UK?
  • The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) due to come into force in May 2018, makes provisions for the online protection of children and young people by insisting on parental consent for anyone under 16 joining social media sites or online services; given that the GDPR would’ve covered children in the UK what provisions are there for introducing similar measures post-Brexit? What will happen to existing EU legislation such as the right to be forgotten? If it does not continue after Brexit, how else will people be protected in this way?

Speakers invitations under consideration

- - - -  Questions, and answer session with delegates - - - -




Speakers

Carolyn Bunting General Manager, Internet Matters

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Alice Miles Director of Strategy and Advocacy, The Children's Commissioner

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12:55 - 13:00
Chair’s and Policy-UK’s Thanks

 
To be announced

End

Speakers

Lord Best Chair, Lords Communications Committee

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Carolyn Bunting General Manager, Internet Matters

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Miles Lockwood Director of Complaints and Investigations, Advertising Standards Authority

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Alice Miles Director of Strategy and Advocacy, The Children's Commissioner

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Richard Pursey CEO and Co-Founder of SafeToNet

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Vicki Shotbolt Chief Executive Officer, The Parent Zone and Executive Board of the UK Council for Child Internet Safety

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Venue details

Central London


Speakers
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