Key Points
  • International students and academic staff - Tackling any misperceptions created by Brexit: The impact of Brexit on perceptions of prospective international students and EU academic staff already working in the UK has been clear, as surveys suggest. This panel will analyse the implications of Brexit on perceptions of the UK's higher education sector overseas and discuss tangible solutions to securing the future of EU students and academic staff and ensuring the UK remains a globally welcoming and competitive HE destination for the brightest and best.
  • Britain's future in higher education research programmes in the EU - Pathways ahead: The importance of Erasmus+, Horizon2020 and other research programmes to Britain's academic institutions has been well documented, as underlined in the Education Select Committee's report from April 2017 on Brexit and higher education. This forward thinking discussion will consider Britain's future within these programmes and what contingency plans should be in place for any eventuality, including funding alternatives to provisions made by European Research Council.
  • Recalibrating - Looking global and serving the local - The realities facing the sector: Amidst a period of significant change facing higher education, the discussion will review the impetus Brexit has possibly provided for regional growth funds and how this can be realised. The conversation will also dwell deeper into the cross-governmental strategy that is currently being sought in supporting international research, collaboration and local communities.
Guest of Honour

Jo Beall Director of Education and Society, British Council

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Overview
With Britain’s departure from the EU and the implementation of the Higher Education and Research Act, the sector of higher education is in a period of significant change. As a sector that has benefited substantively from EU integration and collaboration, through the exchange of students and academic staff alike, along with the UK’s deep involvement in key EU research programmes, means the higher education field will have bespoke questions that need answering in each of these crucial areas. This is irrespective of the final Brexit deal reached. Contingency plans and pathways for such a deeply embedded sector become paramount.

This forum looks at each of these key impact areas head on. Key voices from the field discuss what future trajectories and contingency plans in higher education could and should look like in a period of high uncertainty, to strengthen and maintain the UK’s global standing, research reputation and extensive collaboration in the sector.

Agenda
Start

08:30 - 09:00
Registration, Coffee and Networking

 

09:00 - 09:05
Opening remarks from the Chair

 

09:05 - 09:35
Keynote Address - Protecting the sector's international standing and reach

 

Speakers

Jo Beall Director of Education and Society, British Council

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09:30 - 10:35
Securing the future of international students and academic staff

 
  • The impact of Brexit so far – the tangible and intangible
  • Addressing the possible brain drain    
  • With Universities UK stating that over 80% of students consider studying abroad 12 months in advance of registration on a course, the panel will discuss the possibilities of preferential treatment for EU students and a phased-transition for the 2019-2020 academic year
  • Considerations for removing international students from net migration figures and in partially offsetting any negative impact of Brexit 
  • Support systems to support the recruitment drive for international students and effective marketing strategies at the institutional level 

Speakers

Julia Black Pro Director for Research and Professor of Law, London School of Economics

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10:35 - 10:40
Closing remarks from the Chair

 

10:40 - 10:55
Refreshments and Networking Break

 

10:55 - 11:00
Opening remarks from the Chair

 

11:00 - 12:00
Britain's membership in EU research and outward mobility programmes - pathways ahead

 
The importance of Erasmus+, Horizon2020 and other research programmes to Britain’s academic institutions has been well documented, as underlined in the Education Select Committee’s report from April 2017 on Brexit and higher education. This forward thinking discussion will consider Britain’s future within these programmes and what contingency plans should be in place for any eventuality, including funding alternatives to provisions made by European Research Council.

  • Horizon 2020; Future membership scenarios, considerations for prospective research bidders, post 2020 arrangements for its successor programme (the 9th Framework Programme (FP9) for research and innovation)
  • Erasmus +; With the programme accounting for 55% of outward mobility of UK students, considerations for securing the best possible access to the programme and the creation of a wider outward mobility programme with global penetration
  • Funding and collaboration; The panel will discuss the vital need to replace any funding gaps created by Brexit and how it ought to be directed, whilst simultaneously incentivizing bilateral and multilateral research collaboration
  • Regulatory review; With the EU regulatory framework having been a driver for partnership working across national boundaries, the discussion will consider the outgrowth a new regulatory landscape could provide to facilitate and improve research development


12:00 - 12:55
Recalibrating - Looking global and serving the local - The realities facing the sector

 
Amidst a period of significant change facing higher education, the discussion will review the impetus Brexit has possibly provided for regional injections in funding and how this can be realised. The conversation will also dwell deeper into the cross-governmental strategy that is currently being sought in supporting international research, collaboration and local communities.

  • The impetus Brexit has provided for reinforcing relationships between local communities, business and universities
  • How the industrial strategy and its priorities to support world class research and innovation across the UK and address any regional imbalances ought to be considered in synergy with Brexit and the opportunity to serve local communities
  • With the Science and Technology Committee’s recommending compensating any financial shortfalls in research and development funding from the EU, in its response to the industrial strategy, the conversation will dwell deeper into the need for a cross sectoral and governmental approach to industry and higher education today
  • Looking at future alternatives to EU structural funding through regional growth funds that serve local communities through crucial university partnerships

Speakers

Tom Frostick Policy and Programmes Manager, University Alliance

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12:55 - 13:00
Closing remarks from the Chair

 

End

Speakers

Jo Beall Director of Education and Society, British Council

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Julia Black Pro Director for Research and Professor of Law, London School of Economics

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Tom Frostick Policy and Programmes Manager, University Alliance

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Leo Ringer Head of UK at Global Counsel

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Sponsors & Exhibitors

Cambridge Assessment


Venue details

Central London


Speakers
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